Liverano and Liverano, Florence.

Posted by on Feb 9, 2012 in Men's Clothing | One Comment
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    A window into Liverano's atelier.

    Thank the lord of #menswear that Pitti Uomo isn’t held at a godforsaken hotel conference center somewhere in the vastness of middle America. As hip as it’s become to whine about the strutting dandies and trade show circus at Pitti, it’s still an event crammed with eye candy and the low hum of new things happening in menswear–and it’s in fucking Florence. Which means simultaneous access to Tuscan steak, wine,  good Italian coffee, and tailoring tradition.

    Such as you will find at the atelier of Antonio Liverano, who has been making suits since the 1940s, when he started his business with his brother. I spent some time at Liverano’s atelier in Via Dei Fossi, talking with manager Takahiro Osaki and Signore Liverano about Liverano’s history, cut, and character. Taka and Sig. Liverano (with Taka translating) showed off the hallmarks of Florentine style jackets. Takahiro said the cut is rooted all the way back in 18th century Florence. There’s some English influence in the styling, remnants of when Domenico Caraceni fused Savile Row tailoring with Italian traditions in the early 20th. A Liverano jacket is balanced and flattering on most men–it has natural shoulders (but no spalla camiccia), some room in the chest, a single dart on each side of the body angling inward from the arm, and open quarters. Shorter in length than some others, the Florentine cut, said Taki, is distinguishable from Roman and Neapolitan cuts–Roman having more structure (think Brioni) and Neapolitan being softer, more casual, and often closer to the body. On a Liverano jacket, the shoulder seam angles back from the collar to the shoulder. The default pocket style is jetted (no flaps), and, naturally, jackets have double vents. Of course, details are details, and can potentially be aped by other makers; the cut, though, there’s a nuance to it that’s unique to Liverano.

    Signore Liverano.

    Although I spent the most time there on a chilly January evening, I visited the atelier several times during our time in Florence, as I was in the neighborhood often and the shop was busy with customers, many of whom were in town for Pitti. The gentlemen from the Armoury stopped in–both Ethan and Mark have had garments made by Liverano. Fortunately I could chat with those guys or browse Liverano’s selection of ready-to-wear tailoring, as well as shirts, ties, pocket squares, socks, hats, scarves, and gloves. Sig. Liverano spoke with customers, wearing a pinstripe suit, purple knit tie, and Alden chukkas. I said it was good to see renowned tailors breaking some established rules. Taka assured me that they were playing with rules; but recommended not playing with the rules too much.

    Ties, soporific and otherwise.

     

    Taka also showed me some details on their bespoke shirts. On a blue broadcloth shirt, there was no placket and no pocket–styling choices Liverano considers to add elegance. Gussets are set by hand. The collar and cuffs are not entirely soft–there’s some lining and stiffness. They recommend a decent amount of tiespace for the tie, as they prefer a larger knot. The language barrier became apparent as we tried to describe shirt components, although Taka’s English is good. Taka admitted that it was sometimes difficult getting certain expressions across, as many of their customers speak English only. But they manage. New bespoke customers who are local can expect a suit to be made in about a month and a half, with two fittings. Repeat customers can have a suit made with only one. Liverano keeps customers’ paper patterns in the atelier.

    The shirts get the pleated shoulder treatment, not the jackets.

    Liverano ready to wear as well–the balance tilts more toward the bespoke side these days. Most customers order full suits rather than odd jackets and many are local, at least to Italy. There are also a lot of Liverano fans in Japan, among the Yasuto Kamoshita, designer of the Camoshita line for United Arrows and a longtime Liverano customer. Liverano’s wares have been available for about 4 years at a shop-in-shop through United Arrows and their Sovereign House shop, where Liverano travels several times each year for trunk shows.

    United Arrows preview!

    For fabrics, every year, they buy from Zegna, Draper’s, and Dormeuil, among others. Taka said most customers trust them to choose.  “Some people say we’re particular–really, customers don’t choose the fabrics. We reach an understanding.” He picked up a bolt of fabric and tossed it over my shoulder. “This fabric, it’s too close to your skin. This one,” picking up another, “has more contrast.” Taka said at Liverano, they have an understanding of a customer’s face, shape, and coloring, and can choose fabrics that will lead to a more elegant result. “We know how to make a beautiful suit,” said Taks. “And we can explain that to our customers. They trust us. We will ask them, when they buy a suit, ‘Where will you go with this?’” Liverano will also help choose accessories. With certain fabrics, you’ll want a bright color shirt, a brilliant tie, to complement yourself and the suit. The accessories, they told me,  can help you wear the suit better.

    I took a quick tour through the back rooms at the atelier. From the street Liverano looks like a small shop, but several busy workrooms, offices, storage, and even a garden are nestled neatly in the interior of the block. Like a Liverano suit, there’s hidden complexity, worth exploring, behind the elegant appearance.

    Work in the atelier, steps from Liverano's garden.

    Liverano and Liverano
    Via Dei Fossi, 43r.
    50123 Florence Italy
    055 239 6436
    055 267 6435
    info@liverano.com

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      One Response to “Liverano and Liverano, Florence.”

      1. Peter says:

        Ah, to have a Liverano suit…