A visit to E. Marinella, Naples.

Posted by on Feb 20, 2012 in Men's Clothing | 2 Comments
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    By Derek Guy, correspondent at large

    The finest in soporificity.

     

    E. Marinella’s shop is quite small. It looks out across the park towards the waterfront and its entrance is framed with imported English wood and Calabrian green marble. As soon as you walk in, there is a wrought-iron Liberty-style chandelier that hangs above your head and wooden display tables in front of you that hold an array of beautiful ties. Rep stripes and Macclesfield prints, all made in a rainbow of colors, are showcased alongside a small selection of watches, colognes, ashtrays, and leather goods. Everything here is essentially the same as it was in 1914, before the two world wars and three political regimes that Marinella has seen Italy go through.

    E. Marinella has remained here since its opening, even though the company has far outgrown it. There’s simply not enough room here for its inventory or operation. Thus, behind the shop—outside and up the stairs—is a showroom for not only its full collection of neckties, but also all the accessories that the company offers.

    Scarves and squares.

     

    Timepieces at Marinella.

     

    For example, there are the watches that Maurizio (the third generation Marinella man behind the company) has put into production. These actually began with a funny story. It’s often advised that you should leave your Rolex at home when visiting Naples, given the city’s reputation for crime and disorder. As such, Maurizio decided to give his clients plastic watches, which they could wear in place of their more expensive pieces while they were in town. These plastic watches, however, soon became collectors items and clients held on to them for their value. After seeing their unintended success, Maurizio decided to produce a small collection of watches that reflected his passion for timepieces and the company’s sense of style. Today, these watches are made with steel cases and Swiss movements and classic designs.

    Neapolitan history in ceramic.

     

    They also have incredible ashtrays with paintings of the city’s history, allowing a customer to leave not just with something that reminds them of Marinella, but also of Naples. Near the ashtrays are fine leather belts in a range of brown tones and colorful Kilim scarves.

    Loredana, the woman who assisted me at the store, was also kind enough to show me Marinella’s assortment of cufflinks and charms, some of which were made out of precious red coral. Red coral has an elevated place in Neapolitan culture. The origin of the material is believed to be explained in a Greek myth about Perseus. Having just petrified Cetus, a sea monster threatening Andromeda, Perseus placed Medusa’s head on the riverbank while he washed his hands. When he recovered the head, he noticed that Medusa’s blood turned the seaweed into red coral. The material is now believed to protect people from danger and disease, and cure women of sterility. For this reason, a pair of red coral cufflinks would be very special, though also not very cheap.

    Links and charms at Marinella.

     

    More affordable items in the store include a handsome selection of Italian leather wallets. The simpler card cases start around $125, and they’re excellently made. The leather is finely stitched and the edges are better finished than I’ve seen on most handmade wallets stateside. There are also colognes and perfumes, starting at $110. The red-bottled 286 smells of lavender, sage, and tobacco, with amber and musk at the base. The unnamed blue bottle has a citrusy, almond scent with hints of marine and musk. One of the upsides to these scents is that they’re hard to find outside of Naples (I know only of De Corato carrying them), which means you’re unlikely to risk smelling like another man.

    Perhaps most affordable of all were the bath slippers, which came in either a simple ivory or baby blue, with discreet “E. Marinella” embroidery at the top. At about $60 for a pair, should you not be able to leave with anything else, you can probably at least leave with these.

     

    Derek Guy also writes at Die! Workwear and Put This On.

    E. Marinella
    Riviera di Chiaia, 287
    Naples, Italy
    Ph. +39 081 245 11 82
    marinella@marinellanapoli.it

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      2 Responses to “A visit to E. Marinella, Naples.”

      1. Shaya says:

        Excellent reading and nice pictures, thank you.

      2. The red coral in the shape as shown is worn as you said, to cure ills, but is also more generally worn to protect the carrier from “malocchio”, or the evil eye. Napolitans are very superstitious and this is one of the more visible superstitions.

        An nice little vignette on Marinella, though the part about clients leaving their Rolex at home” seems a bit insulting and high minded. Reminds me of what Michael A Ledeen wrote in “Virgil’s Egg” about how someone in Naples will always be there to help you up if you fall, but will steal you watch and wallet while they do so. If you’re an idiot, you will get your watch stolen, no matter where you travel. It can happen in Naples, and even “civilized” places like New York, Paris, and London. I think it speaks more about the people visiting than the people who live there.